Assignment 2, Stitched Samples

 

As a follow on from my previous post – these are the images, some of work in progress others that are complete of my stitch samples. I struggles with these because I found it hard to keep up the focus in order to capture the marks.

I think I was still working (still am!) in a ‘literal’ way of trying to recreate the marks themselves and this means I sometimes lose sense of the aim to capture the actually qualities of those marks.

In the end I have had to accept that this is not my strong point but I have had to move on as I felt like I came to such a state of inertia with it!

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I did select from a number of threads (see title image), but when it came to it worked mostly with the black. I gathered black wool and different cottons and black threads. I doubled them up in some instances.

As suggested in the course book. I did indeed like the back just as much as the front of many of the samples!

I did select from a number of threads (see title image), but when it came to it worked mostly with the black. I gathered black wool and different cottons and black threads. I doubled them up in some instances.

The irony is that I really like the aesthetic qualities of these samples! Maybe they are ‘unfinished’ but I like these. I liked leaving all the threads on, especially with any machine stitching I did. They add another layer, a delicate and fragile quality to the work that I feel suited the images and close ups I chose.

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Reflecting on work so far – transferring marks into stitch samples

I am recognising that part of this creative block is probably due to the need to transfer my drawings and marks into stitch. I love stitch. I enjoy free motion embroidery. But was aware that the task was emphasising the practice of spending some time on hand stitch. I own and indeed enjoying reading and rereading my copy of “Slow Stitch” by Alice Kettle. I love the idea of it. I have thought about this and finally reflected that what happens is I have all of these ideas. I know what I want to explore, but hand stitching slows everything down so much, and then I once again experience this huge gap between what I am making and what I am envisaging. I guess because my time is so tight, I am a single mother to a two year old, and working too, I have very little time when I have the energy to focus on my own creativity. So I want it to be productive. I want it to have some pace and to feel a sense of achievement. If I think back to the Introductory assignment, I had a few drawings on the go at all times. I know I can get bored easily, so I have found a successful way around this in everything that I do, where I have lots of jobs on the go, where I can leave one task and put my energy into another so that I don’t spend too much time in some sort of unproductive inertia. I need to find a way of working with these stitch samples faster. I need to keep them on rotation and consider working in layers….

Paper Manipulation

I need to crack on and write these up. It’s been some time since I actually did the exercise of the paper manipulation – over 6 months ago! Luckily I did photograph at the time and wrote some notes, so this post is a quick summary – to bring myself up to speed.

I’ve found that sometimes, the process of writing the blog has slowed me down. It’s only recently that I have been thinking and having conversations about the creative process with different people – that I have to remind myself that the reason I am studying this course is for me – so it needs to be a pleasure and not a drag or a drain! I am conscious that I am writing some of these posts BECAUSE I am studying online, and for the ease of assessment and for my tutor to keep track of what I am doing. So maybe this sometimes struggles with my real working process. I have discovered, and this has surprised me; that I do have perfectionist tendencies and this can sometimes halt my progress completely. So this post is a letting go and an acceptance of my limitations and what I am able to do.

As a result it is less polished, and more a presentation of images and notes. This is important to me as I hone my blog as something that works for me…

PAPERS:

I chose a variety: brown paper, thick printmaking card like paper, carbon paper, sugar paper, tracing paperOut of the drawings and images I chose, I linked up papers that I thought might lend themselves to the qualities.

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Brown paper three ways: loosely scrunched, wetted, scrunched and punctured, punctured with needle and hammer. The idea was to emulate the gritty, but soft marks made by the drypoint.

The other images I chose (see Exercise 2.1 Selecting  for images):

My ‘dynamic’ collage – that had strong sharp direction – slashing/cutting/strong folds and diagonals were my focus

My large ink drawing of the still life flowers – these had qualities of boldness to them

My small watercolour square: there was a playful quality I wanted to create so I chose to puncture and scrunch many of my papers with a randomness

A small mono print: inky, linear, textured, patterned – I folded, cut, used tracing and carbon papers

The fine liner close up on watercolour: crispy, edgy hard lines

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